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    Hungarian Revolution 1956

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    Tibor Deri, well-known Hungarian writer, addresses the meeting of the Petöfi Cercle on June 27, 1956.

    56-04-02/17A

    The Petoefi-Club,named after the hero-poet of the Hungarian Revolution 1848,was a meeting place for intellectuals critical of the Communist Party-line. On June 27, 1956, a discussion was held on the press- and information policy of the Geroe-government.

    56-04-04/16

    Daily Life in Communist Hungary: a 5 o'clock in a Budapest coffeehouse,prior to the Hungarian Revolution of October 1956. Budapest, 1956

    56-05-02/37

    In a stormy meeting of the Hungarian Writers' Association, Györgo Szudy called the planned raise of agricultural production "simply idiotic". The Writers' Association was dissolved in January 1957 and permitted to be re-established in 1959 only.

    56-05-31/30

    Production meeting in Sztálinváros (Stalin City). Labour unrest and some strikes began among the privileged steelworkers months before the outbreak of the Hungarian Revolution.

    56-05-51/24

    Hungarian Prime minister Hegedues (right)with the President of the Hungarian Republic Isztvan Dobi, during a meeting of the Peoples'Front executive in spring 1956.

    56-05-52/ 9A

    The Hungarian Revolution began with a first mass-rally in Budapest on October 23, 1956. It was crushed by Soviet tanks and artillery after days of street-fighting. During the first days of the Hungarian Revolution, food distribution became irregular and shops closed. Queues in front a Budapest food shop.

    56-09-01/26A

    Under Hungarian Communism, Protestants, Catholics and Jews were fairly free in the exercise of their religion. Some leaders of the churches were imprisoned. Joszef Cardinal Mindszenty returned to Budapest on October 31, 1956, after 8 years in an AVH (Secret Police) prison in Felsoepeteny. On November 4, he fled to the US-Embassy in Budapest, where he remained until 1971. He was permitted to leave Hungary in 1971 and lived in Vienna until his death in 1975.

    56-09-12/21

    Under Hungarian Communism,Protestants,Catholics and Jews were fairly free to exercise their religion,but leaders of the Christian churches were persecuted. Cardinal Joszef Mindszenty after his release from prison, Budapest,October 1956.

    56-09-20/11

    Under Hungarian Communism,Protestants,Catholics and Jews were fairly free to exercise their religion,but leaders of the Christian churches were persecuted. Cardinal Joszef Mindszenty after his release from prison, Budapest,October 1956.

    56-09-20/20

    The Hungarian Revolution began with a first mass-rally in Budapest on October 23,1956.It was crushed by Soviet tanks and artillery after days of street-fighting. Insurgents resting.Budapest,1956

    56-09-23/ 5A

    Aftermath of the Hungarian Revolution. People queuing for cigarettes in Dunapentele (Sztalinvaros), the pride of Communist Hungary's heavy industry and yet a center of the Revolution in October and November 1956. Dunapentele, 1956

    56-10-02/23

    Aftermath of the Hungarian revolution. Meeting of the Dunapentele Works Council. The director remained in charge after the Revolution, but the Communist Party secretary, once a power-broker, disappeared and did not report back to the steelmill. Dunapentele,1956

    56-10-03/27A

    Aftermath of the Hungarian Revolution. People walking past ruins. Around Christmas 1956, public transport was still interrupted by street damage. Budapest, 1956

    56-10-12/24

    Aftermath of the Hungarian Revolution. Membership meeting of an agricultural cooperative in Karzag in the Hungarian Puszta, the vast plain in the East of the country. Members elected officials and presidents, but voting was usually along lines prescribed by the Communist Party. Karzag, 1956

    56-10-16/ 4A

    Aftermath of the Hungarian Revolution. Membership meeting of an agricultural cooperative in Karzag in the Hungarian Puszta, the vast plain in the East of the country. Members elected officials and presidents, but voting was usually along lines prescribed by the Communist Party. Karzag, 1956

    56-10-16/19A

    The statue of Imre Nagy, Prime minister during the Revolution, stands near the Hungarian Parliament, site of some of the fiercest battles in 1956. Nagy was executed in 1958.

    98-01-01/33

    Budapest revisited 42 years after the Hungarian Revolution.Szobor Park in the outskirts of Budapest, now houses a collection of Communist statuary,mostly in the style called "Socialist Realism".

    98-01-01/37

    Budapest revisited 42 years after the Hungarian Revolution:Imre Mecs,President of the Defence Committee of the Hungarian National Assembly.When the Revolution was over,Mecs was sentenced to death,but pardoned minutes before his execution.

    98-01-05/ 4

    Andras Hegedues,Hungarian Stalinist and Prime Minister from May through October 1956,photographed shortly before his death in 1999. After two years of exile in Moscow after the Revolution,he fell out of favour when he oppoesed the intervention in Czechoslovakia in 1968.

    98-01-06/ 7A

    When Imre Nagy announced that Hungary would leave the Warsaw Pact,the Soviets decided that the Revolution had gone too far and sent the Red Army to crush it. 42 years later,on February 18,1998,the Hungarian Parliament voted to apply for membership in NATO.

    98-01-07/25A

    Budapest revisited 42 years after the Hungarian Revolution.Arpad Goencz,President of the Hungarian Republic,during a meeting in his office.On the wall a portrait of Lajos Kossuth (1802-1894),Hungarian national hero who fought for Hungary's independence from the Habsburg Empire.

    98-01-10/ 9

    Budapest revisited 42 years after the Hungarian Revolution.Arpad Goencz,President of the Hungarian Republic,during a meeting in his office.On the wall a portrait of Lajos Kossuth (1802-1894),Hungarian national hero who fought for Hungary's independence from the Habsburg Empire.

    98-01-10/30

    Andras Hegedues,a leading Stalinist and Hungarian Prime Minister from May through October 1956.After two years of exile in Moscow,he returned to Hungary, but fell out of favour when he opposed Soviet inter- vention in Czechoslovakia in 1968.

    98-01-11/22

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